panthema / 2013 (page 2 of 1 2)
Thumbnail of a pie chart filling to 100%

Released disk-filltest 0.7 - Simple Tool to Detect Bad Disks by Filling with Random Data

Posted on 2013-03-27 21:32 by Timo Bingmann at Permlink with 0 Comments. Tags: c++ utilities

This post announces the first version of disk-filltest, a very simple tool to test for bad blocks on a disk by filling it with random data. The function of disk-filltest is simple:

  • Write files random-######## to the current directory until the disk is full.
  • Read the files again and verify the pseudo-random sequence written.
  • Any write or read error will be reported, either by the operating system or by checking the pseudo-random sequence.
  • Optionally, delete the random files after a successful run.

See the disk-filltest project page for more information about version 0.7.


Memory profile plot as generated by example in malloc_count tarball

Released malloc_count 0.7 - Tools for Runtime Memory Usage Analysis and Profiling

Posted on 2013-03-16 22:17 by Timo Bingmann at Permlink with 1 Comments. Tags: c++ coding tricks

This post announces the first version of malloc_count, a very useful tool that I have been fine-tuning in the past months. The code library provides facilities to

  • measure the current and peak heap memory allocation, and
  • write a memory profile for plotting.
  • Furthermore, separate stack_count function can measure stack usage.

The code tool works by intercepting the standard malloc(), free(), etc functions. Thus no changes are necessary to the inspected source code.

See the malloc_count project page for more information about version 0.7.


Instacode coloring of assembler code

Coding Tricks 101: How to Save the Assembler Code Generated by GCC

Posted on 2013-01-24 18:07 by Timo Bingmann at Permlink with 2 Comments. Tags: c++ coding tricks frontpage

This is the first issue of a series of blog posts about some Linux coding tricks I have collected in the last few years.

Folklore says that compilers are among the most complex computer programs written today. They incorporate many optimization algorithms, inline functions and fold constant expressions; all without changing output, correctness or side effects of the code. If you think about it, the work gcc, llvm and other compilers do is really amazing and mostly works just great.

Sometimes, however, you want to know exactly what a compiler does with your C/C++ code. Most straight-forward questions can be answered using a debugger. However, if you want to verify whether the compiler really applies those optimizations to your program, that your intuition expects it to do, then a debugger is usually not useful, because optimized programs can look very different from the original. Some example questions are:

  • Is a local integer variable stored in a register and how long does it exist?
  • Does the compiler use special instructions for a simple copy loop?
  • Are special conditional instructions used for an if or switch statement?
  • Is a specific function inlined or called each time?

These questions can be answered definitely by investigating the compiler's output. On the Net, there are multiple "online compilers," which can visualize the assembler output of popular compilers for small pieces of code: see the "GCC Explorer" or "C/C++ to Assembly v2". However, for inspecting parts of a larger project, these tools are unusable, because the interesting pieces are embedded in much larger source files.

Luckily, gcc does not output binary machine code directly. Instead, it internally writes assembler code, which then is translated by as into binary machine code (actually, gcc creates more intermediate structures). This internal assembler code can be outputted to a file, with some annotation to make it easier to read.

This article continues on the next page ...

Show Page: 1 2